Getting to the Good Stuff

This post contains ads & affiliate links (this links to our full disclosure about browser cookies, and way more than you probably wanted to know about ads and affiliate marketing). We make a small commission when you purchase from some of the links shared in this post. Making a purchase from a link will not cause you to pay more or affect your purchase in any way. It will however, support our wildest farmin' dreams, which is mighty awesome of you

This is what we came here for. A place to create what we consume. After months of planning, doubting, discussing, doubting again, and anticipation, we are finally getting to the good stuff. I'm relieved because the new seedlings, monstrous plants that were planted in containers in May, bags of soil and mulch, and even flats of strawberries were starting to pile up on the porch.

Have I ever told you patience is not a virtue I possess? I feel like a more patient person after two weeks of cool breezes and fresh air, but it still needs some work. I've been chomping at the bit to get the potager really going ever since we arrived. My daily trips to the Amish greenhouse was not a very subtle hint that sanity was being lost with every day that ended with empty garden beds. I like to think this sense of urgency I feel for just about everything has really served us since I can announce that exactly two weeks after the Penske was unloaded we have plants in the ground.

I repeat. WE HAVE PLANTS IN THE GROUND!

Not only are they in the ground, but they are in rows. Nice rows. They are also (mostly) mulched. All thanks to Jared and the kids for spending a whole week of their evenings weeding the garden beds with me, a kind neighbor that brought over his tractor and tiller, my in-laws for their garden wisdom and manual labor, and Jared again for spending Father's Day planting (which my father in law also did, I am forever grateful to him as well).

It's going to be so pretty once we finish mulching!

It's going to be so pretty once we finish mulching!

It's not every day we garden under a rainbow. Just Father's Day!

It's not every day we garden under a rainbow. Just Father's Day!

In the garden there are now 36 strawberry plants, 70 or so red onions, 70 or so yellow onions, 30 garlic bulbs, 2 rows of beets, and a row of carrots. It is an excellent start. As the week continues some of the potted monsters will get transplanted. We have several tomato, zucchini, yellow squash, pumpkin, and melon plants just begging to get in the ground. Some are even starting to flower or are working on their respective fruit or veggie. Besides the weeds, the pots did so well with 25% potting soil and 75% native soil we decided to plant the bed just tilled with the soil it has and we're going to mulch and fertilize with compost tea as necessary. I know originally we discussed not planting the garden beds at all until a fence could be erected, but when the neighbor volunteered his tractor we got right to weeding. If we could put in a real garden year one I wanted to do it if for nothing else than practice. It was back breaking work, but a great lesson in just getting the work done when it needs to be. We didn't plan on spending our first week here weeding, and we didn't plan to spend Father's Day planting, but that's just the way the timing went. Once the beds were tilled we had to work quickly before the ground hardens up again.

In other happy news we have a beautiful new kitchen compost bin, and a nice 120 gallon compost bin in a garden bed. We've had the kitchen compost bin for a week and I'm happy to report no smells have come from it (and it is packed full since we've had family here all week). In addition to the bin we opted for the compostable bags and extra carbon filters. We will not be able to compost enough for all of our gardening with what we have, but it's a start. We're mulling over some nice open air compost bins to line the side of the barn with to compost yard waste in. Right now it is still piling up in the pasture. As soon as we get a pitchfork I'll turn it and see if it's doing anything. May as well use the pasture for something since it will stay animal free this year.

The chicks are also here and they can't wait to meet you. As soon as I catch my breath or unpack a box there will be proper introductions made. In all the excitement we are still dodging teetering box towers in the house, sleeping on a mattress on the floor, and begging for rain so we have an excuse to stay inside for the day.

Our first yellow squash.

Our first yellow squash.

It is not all gardening under rainbows around here, but Jared found this beautiful short that was shot right here in our new town and I just had to share. The poem resonates with my soul in a way that I can't adequately describe in words, so you'll just have to watch it.

Want to keep up with our new crazy farm life? Subscribe to our newsletter (that I usually fail to send out.....)!

Follow us on Facebook and Instagram for real time updates. I always share when there's something good going on!

This post contains ads & affiliate links (this links to our full disclosure about browser cookies, and way more than you probably wanted to know about ads and affiliate marketing). We make a small commission when you purchase from some of the links shared in this post. Making a purchase from a link will not cause you to pay more or affect your purchase in any way. It will however, support our wildest farmin' dreams, which is mighty awesome of you

Now that a tractor has been here can we call it a farm?

Now that a tractor has been here can we call it a farm?