How to Be a Real Homesteader

This post contains ads & affiliate links (this links to our full disclosure about browser cookies, and way more than you probably wanted to know about ads and affiliate marketing). We make a small commission when you purchase from some of the links shared in this post. Making a purchase from a link will not cause you to pay more or affect your purchase in any way. It will however, support our wildest farmin' dreams, which is mighty awesome of you.

Photo credit to the talented  www.actnaturallyphotography.com  My real boots

Photo credit to the talented www.actnaturallyphotography.com My real boots

The internet is a funny place.

On one hand it's full of more information than one can possibly absorb in one lifetime. So many tutorials, videos, blogs, wonderful people willing to share that information, and communities full of friends you haven't met yet who's eyes light up just like yours at similar things. With all of this at my fingertips I find myself excitedly reading, and researching projects and ideas I have dreamed about for forever, or had no idea existed a few days prior, and reaching out to people I "know" with questions or words of encouragement without a second thought. 

On the other hand, it is a place that has the potential to sow self doubt like nobody's business. I love perusing blogs, and Instagram feeds filled with all of the wonderful things everyone else is doing, but it can also fill me with a heavy feeling in the pit of my stomach. Who do I think I am to be sharing what I'm doing and why? The only thing I have on my property is a flock of chickens I mostly worry over, garden beds that are filled with weeds, and an orchard that came *this* close to being totally annihilated by Japanese Beetles.

Photo credit to the talented  www.actnaturallyphotography.com   I'm holding Piggy & Himalaya as month old chicks here.

Photo credit to the talented www.actnaturallyphotography.com  I'm holding Piggy & Himalaya as month old chicks here.

When letting self doubt run wild, it's easy for me to feel like I'm not a real homesteader. But then I remind myself that you get nowhere by comparing yourself and your progress to others. I took my licks this summer, and am working on evaluating what I did wrong, and what I have the ability to do better. My resolve to make this a "real homestead" has never been stronger. I do this because it's my dream, I wanted to provide a different life for my family, and someday I hope to leave it all to my children or grandchildren.

Photo credit to the talented  www.actnaturallyphotography.com   Aurora holding Piggy, one of the chicks she named.

Photo credit to the talented www.actnaturallyphotography.com  Aurora holding Piggy, one of the chicks she named.

Which is why I was so excited a little nervous when Theresa Loe over at the Living Home Grown Podcast invited me for an interview. Those seeds of self doubt sowed themselves deep leading up to it. I'm so glad I did it though, because I really enjoy sharing my story and why we are doing things the way we are. The podcast episode covers some of why we left the suburbs, how we went about finding our new town, and what we did/didn't accomplish our first summer. If you haven't listened yet I'd be totally honored if you did. Theresa nailed the description of our interview, easing into homesteading. I laughed for real when I saw that. That's totally what we are doing here. Easing into it. Our way isn't for everyone, but it's working well for us.

Chatting with her reminded me that "Homesteader" is more of a state of mind, not a list of your accomplishments or failures. Call your place what you want: homestead, farm, farmstead, urban farm. Call yourself what you want: homesteader, farmer, czar of your backyard. You get to decide! Whether you want a garden to eat great food from in your suburban backyard, or acres of property with dozens of animals to tend, you are a real homesteader should you choose that title to refer to yourself as. The pace at which you build your homestead and when you call it done is all for you to determine.

Planting Strawberries and Onions in June. Way too late for onions!!!

Planting Strawberries and Onions in June. Way too late for onions!!!

If after you've listened you have any questions about researching towns and their livestock laws, what we looked for in our new homestead, or more detail on anything Theresa and I discussed, I invite you to post your question in the comments here on the blog. I'll find a forum of some type to answer them. I'm thinking either a follow up blog post, or maybe a Q&A video? We'll see. It's possible the podcast answered all your questions and you have none! I can't shake this feeling I left some details out though, so I wanted the opportunity to fill in those blanks.

While you are waiting for an answer to your question, head on over to the new Homestead Skills Book Club. We're getting started on our first book now and I'm so excited to be hosting this group. I could think of no better way to work my way through the giant stack of books I've acquired while getting to know all of you. Or join me on Instagram and Pinterest!

Cheers!

Bev

This post contains ads & affiliate links (this links to our full disclosure about browser cookies, and way more than you probably wanted to know about ads and affiliate marketing). We make a small commission when you purchase from some of the links shared in this post. Making a purchase from a link will not cause you to pay more or affect your purchase in any way. It will however, support our wildest farmin' dreams, which is mighty awesome of you.